Neosynapse Logo solving big data problems

Does your organization have someone who always brings up the risks and dangers of storing data?  A Chief Privacy Officer, a Chief Security Officer, or a Chief Risk Officer?  There is a reason those are C-level jobs. And as hundreds of organizations have learned the hard way, “data spills” can be catastrophic to an organization’s public image.

Many organizations control data that isn’t really theirs.  This could include:

  • Data licensed under potentially complicated contract terms.
  • Data generated by users, and governed by privacy policies.
  • Data covered by legal regulations, administrative law, and judicial precedents and orders of all kinds.

Each of these constraints represents a different kind of risk to your organization. And they all require a consistent, provable, secure way of managing those risks.

An unimpeachable chain-of-custody can be hard enough to maintain when all your data fits in a file cabinet.  What about when it is measured in the billions of records?  Who is looking at the data, and what are they searching for?  What transformations have been applied to the data, and where was the data exposed to potential abuses and attacks?

Maintaining a defensible, forensic approach to security within a big data system can become a big data problem in itself.  When this problem surfaces in your environment, you have crossed into the realm of Extreme Compliance.

What our clients are saying:

David did a phenomenal job working in an environment that lacked structure and requirements definition by bringing experience and a calming influence to Canoe.
Michael Iacovelli,
VP Platform & PMO
David drove the project to completion and was extremely effective in a difficult corporate environment. I would hire him again without question.
Warren Schlichting,
SVP Comcast
Wish AOL hired David to be CTO.
Mark Goldstein,
Senior Director, AOL
David has a superior ability to quickly assess a situation and identify business needs then translate them into an action plan.
Kerry Little,
Santa Barbara Bank and Trust
Cory’s interdisciplinary background gave him the ability to see patterns and solutions across different domains that were not apparent to others on the team. These valuable insights have led to opportunities for improvement in the way Intel manages its relationships with academic institutions. I am looking forward to my next occasion to work with Cory.
Ken Anderson, Intel Corporation